A Critical Juncture

A Critical Juncture

During my inpatient sub-I rotation, one of the patients I had been following was transferred to the intensive care unit. As the rotation progressed, my resident would check up on our patient and give us updates like, “oh, they’re on pressure support now,” or “the unit team started weaning pressors today.” So, um,  that meant … Continue reading

For the PreMeds: What’s the Difference bewteen 3rd and 4th Year, anyway?!

For the PreMeds: What’s the Difference bewteen 3rd and 4th Year, anyway?!

Ah, after a bit of a hiatus filled with colorectal surgery and a relaxing summery vacation, I am back in full-force MD2B action. During this time, I officially made the long-awaited transition to my fourth year of medical school. Our fourth year orientation was filled with anxiety-provoking lectures about letters of recommendation, personal statements, and … Continue reading

What Really Makes Medical Students Into “Good” Doctors?

What Really Makes Medical Students Into “Good” Doctors?

I distinctly remember a particularly stressful meeting with my premedical adviser in college. She scrutinized my course schedule and resume, and (quite negatively) informed me that instead of pursuing a communications minor and taking developmental and sensory biology classes, I should take something that would “help me in medical school,” like biochemistry or Latin. I … Continue reading

Rules of Social Media á La MD2B, Part 2 – Discussing Controversial Content Online

The American Medial Association Journal of Ethics recently released its 2011 John Conley Foundation for Ethics and Philosophy in Medicine essay competition topic.  I entered the contest last year, and thought an excerpt from that prompt would be the perfect starting point for the next installment of my observations about social media usage: publishing appropriate … Continue reading

I smile, U-SMILE

If you’re a medical student or physician, you can relate to the sarcasm with which your peers and colleagues (and most specifically, second year medical students), use the term U-SMILE to refer to the first phase of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), or Step 1 Exam. For those who may be unfamiliar, I … Continue reading